A Mindful Society 2019 Agenda

We are excited to share with you our preliminary agenda* for A Mindful Society 2019. We have put a lot of thought into crafting this agenda with an intention to be inclusive and bring together a diverse set of speakers. We hope that this schedule will offer you a balance of different types of energies and experiences, including keynote presentations, interactive workshops and practice sessions. CE credits are available, click here for more information.

2019-05-24
2019-05-24
Pre-Conference Workshop
2019-05-25
2019-05-25
All
2019-05-26
2019-05-26
All
2019-05-27
2019-05-27
Post-Conference Day of Mindfulness
Pre-Conference Workshop
All
All
Post-Conference Day of Mindfulness
09:00 - 16:30
Dr. Dan Siegel Pre-Conference Workshop

Location: Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning Auditorium – SickKids Hospital (The Hospital for Sick Children), 555 University Ave, Toronto, ON Canada

 

Date & Time: Friday May 24, 2019 9:00am to 4:30 pm

 

Workshop Title: Awareness-based Cultural Evolution:  Implications for the Personal and Public Mind.

 

Description:

 

This session is an exploration of the nature of “self.”  Given the human brain’s proclivity to absorb cultural messages and its evolutionary history of tribalism-based survival, the development of our sense of identity is shaped by both genetic propensities and our shared societal ideas.  One of these ideas is of a “solo self.” In this meme, we come to believe that who we are is defined merely by our body and brain, or by small group membership. The processes that create such an identity of separation may be at the heart of personal isolation and despair, interpersonal violence, international conflict, and ecological destruction.  We will examine a common factor of the learned filters of consciousness that construct this separate-self identity.

Contemplative practices that distinguish ‘the knowing of being aware’ from ‘the knowns of consciousness’ may offer a way for individuals to experience an expanded sense of identity.  An example of such a contemplative practice is the Wheel of Awareness meditation which creates a visual metaphor of the mind. Knowing is placed in the hub of the metaphorical ‘Wheel’ and the ‘knowns’ on its rim.  Awareness is then moved around the wheel systematically integrating knowing and the knowns. Findings from a study of thousands of individuals engaging in this meditation will be reviewed, and insights will be offered to explore the nature of awareness, identity, and belonging.   We will examine the idea that the Wheel is an example of a contemplative practice that integrates consciousness. Such practices may provide practical insights into how becoming more openly aware can facilitate an expanded sense of identity and the direct experience of belonging as part of larger humanity and the system of life on earth.  

Learning outcomes (participants will be able to):

1. Identify three pillars of mind training that research suggests, cultivate a range of aspects of well-being.
2.  Distinguish awareness from attention and intention.
3.  Name five physiological factors of health that are improved with mind training.
4.  List four ways the brain becomes more integrated with mind training.
5.  Describe how the default mode network plays a role in mentalizing functions.
6.  Discuss the relationships between identity, belonging, and a “sense of self.”
7.  Outline the components of the “three pillars” of mind training.

 

Facilitator Bio:

 

Dr. Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and the founding co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA. He is also the Executive Director of the Mindsight Institute which focuses on the development of mindsight, which teaches insight, empathy, and integration in individuals, families and communities.

Dr. Siegel has published extensively for both the professional and lay audiences. His four New York Times bestsellers are: Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human, Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain, and two books with Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D: The Whole-Brain Child and No-Drama Discipline. His other books include: The Developing Mind (2nd Ed.), The Pocket Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology, Mindsight, The Mindful Brain, The Mindful Therapist, The Yes Brain (also with Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D), and his recently released book Aware (2018).
Dr. Siegel’s unique ability to make complicated scientific concepts exciting and accessible has led him to be invited to address diverse local, national and international groups including mental health professionals, neuroscientists, corporate leaders, educators, parents, public administrators, healthcare providers, policy-makers, mediators, judges, and clergy. He has lectured for the King of Thailand, Pope John Paul II, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Google University, and London’s Royal Society of Arts (RSA).

 

Register here

07:30 - 08:15
Silent Self-Guided Practice – Breathing Space

Enjoy silence and solitude as you enter the Breathing Space room. A space dedicated to mindful practice throughout the duration of the conference.

07:30 - 08:45
Registration – Late registration available at Info Desk
08:15 - 08:45
Guided Practice (optional) – Breathing Space

Breakout Sessions, Practices, and Posters will be announced February, 2019.

09:00 - 09:30
Conference Opening – Mainstage
09:30 - 10:00
Speaker Presentation – Mainstage
10:15 - 10:45
Refreshments & Mindful Marketplace – The Commons Area
10:15 - 10:45
Q&A with Mainstage Speakers – Mainstage
12:00 - 13:00
Lunch*

* Attendees are encouraged to bring their own lunch or gather in groups to visit surrounding restaurants (list will be provided prior to conference).

13:30 - 14:30
Dr. Dan Siegel Keynote – Mainstage
14:30 - 15:30
Q&A with Keynote Speaker Dr. Dan Siegel – Mainstage
15:00 - 15:45
Refreshment Break & Book Signing
15:15 - 15:45
Community Mindfulness Walk (weather permitting)
16:00 - 17:00
Breakout & Practice Sessions – Breakout Rooms & Breathing Space

Breakout Sessions, Practices, and Posters will be announced February, 2019.

07:30 - 08:30
Silent Self-Guided Practice – Breathing Space

Enjoy silence and solitude as you enter the Breathing Space room. A space dedicated to mindful practice throughout the duration of the conference.

08:00 - 09:00
Light Breakfast & Refreshments
08:15 - 08:45
Guided Practice (optional) – Breathing Space

Breakout Sessions, Practices, and Posters will be announced February, 2019.

09:00 - 09:30
Opening Ceremony – Mainstage
10:00 - 11:00
Poster Showcase & Networking

In the tradition of academic and professional conferences, this is a dedicated time to examine posters and connect with poster presenters who are sharing research information and/or case studies of applied mindfulness. Approximately 20 posters applying and studying the outcomes of mindfulness practice will be up and available for viewing for the duration of the conference.This is a dedicated time to connect with poster presenters.

Breakout Sessions, Practices, and Posters will be announced February, 2019.

10:00 - 10:30
Q&A with Mainstage Speakers – Mainstage
10:00 - 11:00
Refreshment Break
10:00 - 10:30
Guided Practices – Breathing Space

Breakout Sessions, Practices, and Posters will be announced February, 2019.

11:15 - 12:30
Breakout & Practice Sessions – Breakout Rooms & Breathing Space

Breakout Sessions, Practices, and Posters will be announced February, 2019.

12:30 - 14:00
Lunch*

* Attendees are encouraged to bring their own lunch or gather in groups to visit surrounding restaurants (list will be provided prior to conference).

15:00 - 16:00
Culminating Panel– Mainstage
16:00 - 16:45
Closing Ceremony – Mainstage
09:00 - 16:00
Post-Conference Workshop in Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) with Thupten Jinpa PhD

Location: University of Toronto Chestnut Conference Centre, Toronto, Ontario

 

Date and Time: Monday, May 27th, 2019 9am – 4pm

 

CE Credits: Will be available

 

Title: Post Conference Workshop in Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) with Thupten Jinpa PhD

“A compassionate attitude can greatly reduce the distress people feel in difficult situations and can become a profound personal resource in times of stress.”
Stanford CCARE

 

Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is an 8-week educational program innovated by Thupten Jinpa PhD and delivered at Stanford. It is designed to help you improve your resilience and feel more connected to others—ultimately providing an overall sense of well-being. CCT combines traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research to help you lead a more compassionate life. Through instruction, daily meditation, mindfulness, and in-workshop interaction, you can strengthen the qualities of compassion, empathy, and kindness. Learn how to train your mind to intentionally choose compassionate thoughts and actions and develop skills that help you relate to others—and yourself.

 

Who We Encourage to Attend

 

Compassion Cultivation Training is designed to support anyone who wants to cultivate compassion for themselves and for others.

This includes:
– Parents and caregivers
– Educators
– Healthcare professionals and therapists
– Executives and managers
– Public service leaders and employees
– Individuals seeking to increase awareness and mindfulness

People working in a wide range of professions and life contexts can benefit from this program. No previous meditation experience is required, although willingness to practice daily meditation is a key component of the training.

 

Why Enroll?

 

Compassion training extends beyond helping one feel more empathy and concern for others.

It includes the development of:
– The strength to be present with suffering
– The courage to take compassionate action
– The resilience to prevent compassion fatigue

These qualities support a wide range of goals – from improving personal and work relationships to making a positive difference in the world.

Compassion training can also support one’s own health, happiness, and wellbeing. Preliminary research suggests that the CCT course and similar programs can increase self-compassion and self-care, reduce stress, anxiety, and depression, and enhance connection with others.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

Apply basic mindfulness skills to stay present to self and others
Apply learned compassion skills as a response to the everyday needs and demands of one’s personal and professional life
Utilize compassion practice with oneself and others for emotional regulation in the face of distress
Recognize judgmental patterns of mind within oneself and towards others
Utilize cognitive re-framing with oneself and others from the compassionate stance of “common humanity”
Differentiate between empathy and compassion and understand the difference between empathetic distress, compassion collapse and burnout
Utilize self-compassion meditation for oneself in the context of personal and professional relationships
Describe three sources of resistance to the cultivation of self-compassion
Identify three ways to recognize resistance to compassion for others
Utilize mindfulness meditation in order to cultivate compassion
Cite current research studies on the effects and effectiveness of compassion cultivation practice
Establish a daily compassion and meditation practice

 

Register Now

Select date to see events.

*Agenda timing, speakers and presenters may change prior to the start of A Mindful Society 2019

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